What’s Goji All About?

Everybody wants to stay feeling and looking young this is what the goji berry is supposed to do. If you don’t know what goji juice is then you’re not alone. Goji juice comes from a bush that grows mostly in the Himalayans in China. The juice comes from a variety of Lycium bush; this is an evergreen bush that grows in temperate and subtropical regions.

Many people in western cultures have not heard of this amazing juice but the people in China have known about its special properties for many years due to the fact that it has been used in Asian medicine for the nutritional benefits. This has been their little secret for many years, now that their secret is out its good for us because now we can benefit as well.

Many people in this world don’t like to think of themselves as old or getting old, just look in any houses medicine cabinet and you will see anti aging night and day cream, wrinkle remover cream, or liquid makeup that’s suppose to take years off your appearance, but do they really work?

Studies have shown that this juice works in the anti-aging field because of the polysaccharides. Through an extracting process they are able to get the polysaccharides out of the berry. These polysaccharides work as directors and carriers for our cells. They give the cells instructions that are used to communicate with each other. The polysaccharides also control some of our defense systems. The most amazing property of the goji berry is that the polysaccharides found in the plant aren’t found in any other plant in the world.

Goji juice is also said to be rich in antioxidants. In the past few years we have heard how good antioxidants are for better health. This berry also has a lot of vitamins like vitamin C, which helps protect our skin from possible sun damages. Other antioxidant like vitamins that are in goji juice are B1, B2, B6 and E and linoleic acid a fat all help the skin look and feel younger.

If you think that it’s too good to be true just look at who’s using it, woman like Madonna, Mischa Barton and Liz Hurley are all reported to use goji juice, have you seen Madonna lately she doesn’t look over 30 and we all know how old she really is. If you’re still skeptical just buy some of it and try it if nothing else you bought a great tasting juice, that’s got a lot of vitamins and take care of one of the servings of fruit, but maybe you just found the fountain of youth. Studies have found that the longest living people on earth drink at least one serving a day of goji juice. If you’re real careful you might just get the other members of your family to drink it too, all I would have to do is say that I bought it for myself and everyone in my family would drink …

Psychosocial Factors That Promote Successful Aging

There are several psychological and social factors that have been linked to increased individual life expectancy and quality of life in older adults. While the majority of attention in the life extension and successful aging field has focused on physical factors such as exercise, diet, sleep, genetics and so on, there is a growing body of evidence that suggests that psychological and sociological factors also have a significant influence on how well individuals age (Warnick, 1995).

Warnick (1995) believes that adjusting to the changes that accompaniment late adulthood and old age requires that an individual is able to be flexible and develop new coping skills to adapt to the changes that are common to this time in their lives. Aging research has demonstrated a positive correlation between someone's religious beliefs, social relationships, perceived health, self-efficiency, socioeconomic status, and coping skills among others to their ability to age more successfully. The term successful aging has been defined by three main components: "low probability of disease and disease related disability, high cognitive and physical functional capacity, and active engagement with life" (Rowe & Kahn, 1997).

Baltes and Baltes (1990) suggested that the term successful aging appears paradoxical, as aging traditionally brings to mind images of loss, decline, and ultimate death, whereas success is represented by achievement. However, the application of the term, successful aging, they argument forces a reexamination of the nature of old age as it currently exists. "An inclusive definition of successful aging requires a value based, systemic, and ecological perspective, considering both subjective and objective indicators within a cultural context" (Baltes & Baltes, 1990).

With medical advances and improvements in living conditions people can now expect to live longer lives than ever before. But, the prospect of merely living longer presents many problems. This fact has led researchers to investigate the psychological aspects of aging, with a goal of making the additional years more worth living. There is a great deal of information that leads us to be hopeful about the prospective quality of life in late adulthood and old age.

Religious beliefs, spirituality, and church participation have been the focus of numerous studies involving older adults. Various studies have associated religiousness with well-being, life satisfaction or happiness (VanNess & Larson, 2002). Although it will be necessary for future research to further clearly specify which dimensions of religious participation are beneficial to which outcomes (Levin & Chatters, 1998), it appears that certain aspects of religious participation enables older people to cope with and overcome emotional and physical problems more effectively, leading to a heightened sense of well being in late adulthood.

It is commonly known that suicide rates are higher among older people, and there is evidence that persons who engage in religious activities are more than four times less likely to commit suicide (Nisbet, Duberstein, Conwell, et al .: 2000). The inverse association between religiousness and suicide rate in elderly individuals may be due to the fact that religious beliefs help older people cope with or prevent depression …

Low Fat Fallacy

I guess we all know that obesity is at epidemic levels. It’s drummed into us from all angles. Isn’t it strange that we have the biggest range of low-fat foods available but we keep getting fatter?

Isn’t somebody going to stand up and say “It hasn’t worked”?

In the 70’s and 80’s we were told that fat was the enemy, and carbohydrates were good. The USDA Healthy Food Pyramid had carbs as the base (6-11 servings per day). There was however, little mention of the quality of these carbohydrates.

Manufacturers were quick to respond, and began bringing out “Low Fat”, “Fat-Free”, and “Lite” versions of various food products. These are generally the biggest selling items, and have resulted in lot’s of clever marketing tactics – in fact anything to make the consumer feel guilty, and look for the “Fat-Free” option.

Milk – Is Whole Milk Really That Bad?

Most of our modern milk undergoes the process of homogenisation. This process forces the fat globules into an atomiser (i.e. tiny holes) that will form tiny particles. These particles are then evenly dispersed throughout the milk, giving the milk a uniform appearance. Most of our low fat, trim, super-trim milks are created using this process.

However, recent research has shown that structural changes do occur in the homogenisation process. In unhomogenised milk, an enzyme called xanthine oxidase would pass throught the digestive system, and be secreted harmlessly through the bowel. The homogenisation process allows this enzyme to enter the bloodstream.

Some researchers are saying the enzyme attacks the issues of our heart and arteries, encouranging an increase in cholesterol levels!

Low Fat Hasn’t Worked

The evidence of the last twenty years, is showing us that just choosing a low-fat version of a food is not helping us lose weight. In fact, we need to question, the processes that go on to make certain foods “low fat”.

Many blame a high amount of refined carbohydrates (white flours, sugars) as having an impact on our weight problem.

Why Are We So Fat?

More and more evidence is showing that we eat too much, and exercise too little. Our lifestyles are very sedentary, and portion size has increased. The US Center for Disease Control (CDC) has concluded that “we eat a lot – a whole lot more than we used to, and most of the increase comes from refined carbohydrates (sugar).”

In the 1970’s the average person ate 136 pounds of flour and cereal products per year and now it’s up to 200 pounds. The increase is almost all from processed, white flour, high sugar foods. In addition, everything has been super-sized. Example: 1955 McDonald’s French fries – 2.4 ounces, 210 calories. 2004 Super size Fries – 7 ounces, 610 calories.

What’s The Answer?

Don’t get too hung up complex nutrient ratios told to you by the latest diet book. You need to find what works for you and your body. It’s a process of trial and error. Start with a diet, then keep working …

7 Self Help Tips To Improve Your Mental health

"How are you feeling?"

Many people will answer, "I'm fine." But inside they are really feeling confused, disappointed or frustrated.

Many of these feelings are due to holding on to outdated concepts from previous experiences that cause us to act in ways that do not validate our lives. Practicing the daily keyword activities listed below can help you enjoy the benefits of balanced mental health.

Sunday

Inspiration: Feed your creativity. Immerse yourself in gardening, painting, craftwork or drawing and enjoy the creativity you possess.

Result: Dedicating time to activities solely for their enjoyment reinforces your sense of worth and relieves stress.

Monday

Perception: Consciously listening to your thoughts. Visually challenge ideas that are counterproductive by writing them on paper. Select your words carefully to clearly convey information. Speak kindly, but honestly with everyone.

Result: Honest communication begins with yourself. By bringing negative thoughts out of your mind and on to paper, you will able to release them.

Tuesday

Exhilaration: Experience the vitality of life. Give your body freedom of movement in dance, games like Twister or sports. Learn a new physical skill such as CPR or self defense. Organize a paint party with your friends.

Result: Group activities are one of the best ways to revitalize yourself and others. Eliminating movement restrictions on your body also helps resolve emotional and mental barriers.

Wednesday

Mediation: Take a neutral position. Volunteer and befriend a person who needs to be heard. Practice compassion and acceptance of the feelings of others. Detach from your perspective and simply focus on the facts of the situation without judgment.

Result: By releasing the need to be "right" and accepting things as they are, you send the signal of acceptance to your psyche, which helps you achieve better mental balance.

Thursday

Expansion: Enhancing the big picture. Take a project to the next level. Pass on your skills by teaching them to a young person. Help a friend move to a new home or study a new subject to improve your skills.

Result: Actively engaging in bringing about change shows us the positive side of transformation, strengthening our mental and emotional balance for when the unexpected occurs.

Friday

Enrichment: Counting your blessings. Write a list of everything you are grateful to have in your life. Extend assistance to an elderly person you know. Contribute books, music or other media to your local library or school.

Result: Sharing with others reinforces your own sense of security and trust in the unlimited abundance of life. This helps to alleviate anxiety and frustration.

Saturday

Determination: Perseverance and completion. Make the call and resolve an issue that is in limbo. Keep the promise you made to a friend months ago. Clean out the garage or the attic. Sit down with the person with what you have a misunderstanding and clear the air.

Result: Living your personal truth is a cornerstone of good mental health and it takes courage. When you make a commitment and see it through to its conclusion, you demonstrate loyalty …